Tag Archive: TV


916 Acklen Ave., in Nashville

[Read Part One, Two, Three, Four, Five]

Joel and I worked at a sandwich shop in Nashville called Deli Junction. We worked days so we could play or practice at night. One afternoon while we were working, Joel got a phone call. The look on his face told me something was seriously wrong. We couldn’t both leave. He said someone had broken into the apartment. He said he would let me know what had happened.

What had happened was that someone had broken in and stolen every music and sound device in the apartment. My Martin D35 guitar, cassette recorder, stereo, tv, radio, and so forth. Joel’s room was a small room to the left of the kitchen. His Martin D35 was still there in its case.

As we sat there in the den in silence that night, we figured it must have been somebody who knew Joel, so he didn’t take his guitar. As we talked, I thought about the tv against the wall under a blanket or rug – I don’t remember which.

“They probably just figured it didn’t work, so they left it,” I said. “Let’s try it to see if it works.”

We uncovered it, turned it on, and sure as shit it worked. We laughed and everyone looked at me.

“I didn’t watch Perry Mason for nothing!”

It took a while, but we replaced the stereo, the cassette recorder and so on.

Stay tuned for what I did about my guitar being stolen.

_________________________________________

Keep writing the songs that are in your heart.

Peace be with you.

paypal.me/danroark

 

 

 

Brookhaven Country Club

Brookhaven Country Club

Cyndy and I watch golf tournaments on the weekends, particularly this time of year. Baseball, rodeo, and horse races are over and we rarely watch football. I play disc golf, but they do not have the sport on television. So we watch golf - the scenery is beautiful and we do not have to pay constant attention.

On Saturday, we were while watching the OHL Classic at Mayakoba - in Mexico if you did not know that already. It rained for nearly the entire round. But, without lightning present, the round continued. There were times when the rain let up some and times when they had to simply stand under the umbrellas.

I need to interject the fact that sports announcers drive me crazy - as I’m sure they do you. If sports are as special as they are purported to be, then they should be treated as such by the announcers and reporters. “Hat trick” was started with hockey and they should be allowed to keep it. An inning in a baseball game is not a “frame.” That should belong to bowling. You get where I’m going.

Part of the problem is that they do not realize that they could just be quiet and let us watch the game and we would be happy. I do not need the announcers to describe the game to me while I am watching it. The only problem with the review system in baseball is the incessant replaying of the play in question from every angle possible. I’m quite surprised we cannot get a satellite view - not that it would tell us much. And all the dialogue among the announcers when, in the end, their opinion does not matter.

Okay, so I’m watching golf. I’m also working and so on, so I do not have to listen to the continual babbling of the announcers. But I never completely get away clean, as it were. Someone hit a nice drive and the announcer said that the shot was “quite tasty.” Which was not the only time, I’m sorry to say. I ask you, how do you taste a golf shot?

But wait, as they say in infomercials, there’s more. As I was saying, it rained for almost the entire round. Fresh towels would be wet by the next hole. The announcers have “beaten that dead horse” the entire round. And yet, nearing the end of the round - get this - one announcer turns to another and says: “I think their grips might be getting wet!” Need I say more?

Peace be with you.

Jake Batsell, Assistant Professor in the Journalism department at SMU, discussed media convergence and the importance of maintaining a presence in, or on, various media, including social media, at the January meeting of the Dallas-Ft. Worth Chapter of the RCC on January 26. He is also faculty adviser for the student media websites, combined at smudailycampus.com, including the SMU Daily Mustang, a multi-platform news site produced by journalism students, and SMU-TV. Entitled “Media Outreach During Turbulent Times for the News Business,” Batsell’s presentation included results of the longitudinal study of media convergence that he, his colleagues, and students have been conducting.

They began the  study by asking a central research question: To what extent has convergence journalism taken hold in U.S. newsrooms over the past decade, and to what extent have these cross-platform partnerships endured? Newspaper and TV managers in the top 200 U.S. media markets were surveyed in 2002-‘03 (Phase 1), 2004-‘05 (Phase 2), and again in 2011 (Phase 3). Batsell and his colleagues are currently studying the results of phase 3. The results indicate challenges and opportunities for media outreach.

“The bad news is that traditional newsrooms are short-staffed, making cultivating relationships with reporters difficult. When you do interact with reporters, they’ll have less time to absorb your story than they used to.”

The good news, particularly for religion communicators, is that there are more non-traditional ways to get the message out. “Press releases that used to be ignored now might spark a blog post, which can be amplified through social media.” Suggested links to background information during an interview are likely to be included in the story. Alternate media outlets are plentiful, such as NeighborsGo and DallasSouthNews, as well as Pegasus News and Advocate Magazine, in the Dallas area.

Current results of the study show that news managers are focusing on developing interactive relationships with readers and viewers, primarily through social media. Which includes multimedia (both staff-generated and user-generated), news as conversation (blogs, comments, live chats, etc.), and engagement via social media platforms. “Today, news is a two way conversation” between newsrooms of all media and their readers. As religion communicators, we need to join the conversation. In an online world of “likes”, links, blogs, comments, and re-sending articles, and posts, good content and internet interaction are key to delivering our message to more people.

Peace be with you.